Mariko Kosaka

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Web Dev Beginnings with Mariko Kosaka - HTTP203

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05.06.2018

Mariko Kosaka sits down with Jake & Surma to talk about their early experiences with the web & how they got in to coding. Mariko also buys Jake a birthday present... Subscribe to the channel! → 🤍 Watch more HTTP203 → 🤍 Listen to the HTTP203 podcast for more content! → 🤍 Itunes → 🤍

"How to *be* a Compiler" by Mariko Kosaka

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00:37:40
02.10.2017

"Making a compiler" sounds like a lot of computer science… but I've never traversed nodes in a coding interview, can I make a compiler? Let's try to be a compiler. We'll try to compile 3 lines of John Maeda's "Design by Numbers" code to a hand drawing. Yes, let's forget about computer science textbook for now, and be a compiler first. What's the step we need to take? How does our brain translates text into an image? How would a computer achieve each step in program? Learning a new language, whether it's programming or other types, is like training your brain to be a compiler. Especially creative practices like making a drawing from a set of instructions or knitting from a pre-defined pattern is all an act of compiling. Once you understand how compiler acts, you'll not only understand how your code is analyzed and translated under the hood but also learn essential attitude to make better and inclusive environment for software engineering. We all should be a compiler. It's awesome. Mariko Kosaka GOOGLE Mariko is an web engineer who like to fiddle with a browser and yarn. She uses code to help her design textiles and organize a local JavaScript meetup in New York City called BrooklynJS.

Drawing on canvas - how computers read pixels — Mariko Kosaka

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13.05.2016

OpenVis Conf April 25th-26th, 2016 Interact with this and other talk videos on 🤍 Follow us on Twitter for more information: 🤍 "Drawing on canvas - how computers read pixels" — Mariko Kosaka Abstract: Drawing an image on-screen is a fundamental part of making digital graphics. There are so many tools and libraries such as Photoshop and ImageMagic available to us to perform various tasks. We draw, crop, apply filters, and compress images all the time. But what exactly is happening when we use those tools? What do those different settings and parameters mean? Do we need elaborate tools or can we roll up our own? In this talk, Mariko will introduce core concepts in digital imaging and image processing. The talk will explore what is happening on a pixel-level when you draw charts in your screen or apply filters to an image. Once you understand what a pixel is and how to manipulate it, you can make a smart and confident choice in your rendering method and formatting. About our Speaker: Mariko Kosaka is an engineer who loves data and knitting. When she is not making software at Scripto, she uses code to help her design textiles & organize a local JavaScript meetup in New York City called BrooklynJS. More about Mariko: 🤍

Mariko Kosaka & Suz Hinton: Can You Read Me? Creative JS to Make CS Fun | JSConf EU 2017

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00:32:04
20.05.2017

🤍 Two web developers who are full of curiosity to learn all about machines and code met at a meetup. Unsatisfied with traditional computer science textbook and what we felt like not so learner friendly software engineering landscape, we decided to learn by working together in the format we enjoy the most - creative project. We are building machines (both software and hardware) in JavaScript to send secret messages to each other. Different forms of data blob are exchanged periodically as a message. In order to read those messages, each has to learn and build a system to decode the data. This talk will tell the story of the machines, their parts, and the possibilities of remote creative collaboration. You’ll come away with fresh inspiration on how JavaScript can be used to learn computer science concepts the enjoyable way.

Mariko Kosaka: Elektroknit! - JSConf.Asia 2015

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02.01.2016

Electroknit is a craft project to convert graphics into knitted patterns for an electric knitting machine. What does it take to turn a digital image into a physical object like a knitted sweater? The answer is series of image processing operations. As web engineer, we take it for granted that an img-tag displays an image because it is a "digital photo." Let's look at what "a Pixel" is & how you can manipulate for fun with Canvas API & JavaScript. Mariko is an engineer who loves data and knitting. When she is not making software at Scripto, she uses code to help her design textiles & organize local JavaScript meetup in New York City called BrooklynJS. JSConf.Asia - Red Dot Design Museum, Singapore - 20 November 2015. Source: 🤍 Slides: 🤍 License: For reuse of this video under a more permissive license please get in touch with us. The speakers retain the copyright for their performances.

Mariko Kosaka: Knitting for Javascripters | JSConf US 2015

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00:26:26
22.06.2015

Wouldn't it be cool if you could "print out" your own javascript generated bitmap art as a knitted scarf ? Well, you can ! Knitting textiles is a lot like programing computers. You write your knit pattern (code), your brain compiles it, and your hands render knit stitches (1s) and purl stitches (0s). It means you can decipher knitting nomenclature like "k2, m1L, k1, m1L, k until 3 sts remain, m1R, k1, m1R, k2" into JavaScript. This talk will cover how you can program knitting patterns in JavaScript and then use an electronic knitting machine from the 1980's to make beautiful knitted textiles. Transcript: 🤍

Computer Assisted Arts and Crafts – Mariko Kosaka / Front-Trends 2016

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00:36:29
11.07.2016

What do you think of when you hear the term “Arts and Crafts”? You may think yarns on needles or fabric on hoop. But process of making crafts like knitting and embroidery is quite arithmetical. It is a process of figuring out logic and tweaking variables. This sounds all familiar to the web developer. Can we incorporate what we do with computers into these tactile projects like knitting? In this talk, we'll look at how you can apply your dev skills to your craft project, and what doing crafts can teach you about front-end development.

d3.unconf(2016) - Mariko Kosaka

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00:36:15
24.10.2016

Mariko Kosamari gave an inspiring keynote with plenty of encouraging ideas. Her work with d3 is both exemplary and challenging, bringing data well outside the usual confines of a two-dimensional chart. 🤍 🤍

Mariko Kosaka: Making a Robot Eye with JavaScript - JSConf Iceland 2016

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00:35:44
21.09.2016

Have you ever wondered how computers "see" images? Do you want to work on an AR (Augmented Reality) project or build a NodeBot that can recognize your face? When you work with an image as your data input, sooner or later you'll encounter the magic term "Computer Vision. It can be intimidating to some. At first, that led me to choose a powerful library that works like magic in an unfamiliar language (C). It felt like library was a black box and I had no control. I started wonder, what is so magical about computer vision? After all it is just code someone wrote. Can we unravel it? and reconstruct in JavaScript?? The answer is YES. In this talk, we'll start by getting image data from canvas object, then transform the data to alter an appearance of the image. You will get first insight into what data looks like to a browser (hint: it's just an array of numbers !). Finally, we'll go through simple image analysis process to build your own AR app in vanilla JavaScript!

Mariko Kosaka

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08.02.2017

Nordic.js 2016 • Mariko Kosaka - Magic of Computer Vision Unraveled

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15.09.2016

Mariko Kosaka gave this talk at Nordic.js 2016. Read more at 🤍

Mariko Kosaka – Once upon a punch card - how textiles can explain why we have the web

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22.10.2015

Reject.JS 2015 – Berlin, September 24, 2015 Mariko Kosaka (🤍kosamari) # Once upon a punch card - how textiles can explain why we have the web From a textile loom, to a teletype terminal, to a desktop computer, to the web; the stitches in your garment and the letters on your screen are both the result of operations executed on data. When I first learned to code websites, I took it for granted that img-tag displayed an image because it is a “digital photo.” When I learned Node.js, saying “use Buffer” and “create a Stream” became routine. But I never really understood what a “chunk of data” looked like. Then I started a craft project to convert digital graphics into knit patterns for an electric knitting machine. Little did I know, I was researching the origins of computing, data storage and digital communication: textile looms operated by punch cards. By knitting fabric, I learned to give instructions to a machine with just 2 signals. I discovered what a ‘bit’ really is, in my scarf! This physical, tactile experience with binary made everything in my JavaScript work much clearer. I’d like to share my discovery process, and through some hacks and textiles give a friendly explanation about the “world of bits”. 🤍 - 🤍 Music by: 🤍 Video by: 🤍

Mariko Kosaka - Building apps that are on FIRE

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27.11.2017

View Source 2017. View Source is a conference for front-end web developers. The goal of this event is to provide an in-depth, practical look at current and on-the-horizon technologies, with plenty of opportunities for conversation.

5. Mariko Kosaka / Power of Emoji

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00:43:29
02.12.2016

From improving performance 📈 of mobile web in 1999 to reacting with 👍 and 🎉 on our Pull Request in 2016, Emoji has become part of our daily communication. Emoji is fun and ambiguous, let's look at how it became part of our daily communication & how we can invent new use as creators of the web! ❤️ 💯 💁

View Source 2018 - Mariko Kosaka - Back to the Future: Why the web is still the next big thing

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00:42:25
31.10.2018

Thirty years ago the web was the next big thing, but the vision for a great user experience was ahead of its time. Despite challenges, the web has risen and is more capable today than it has even been. Users are having a better experience on the open web but there is still more work to be done. Join Mariko Kosaka, Developer Advocate at Google to discover modern web features and some challenges ahead.

A web platform feature is born! – massively distributed multiplayer engineering | Mariko Kosaka

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16.08.2019

accessible for deaf/hearing-impaired: sign language interpreter (DGS) visible for complete duration + captions // slide collection 🤍 // License: CC BY-ND 🤍 One of the unique thing about the web is that no one owns the platform. There are multiple runtime environments available from different browser vendors, and new features are being added every day by different organizations. In this talk, we’ll look at how web platform features are proposed, developed, and tested. We’ll go over what kind of systems are in place to coordinate a massively distributed engineering project, and why you should get involved! notes: - Chromium Project on Launching features 🤍 - example for an explainer 🤍 - Chrome Platform Status 🤍 - TAG 🤍 - request of a TAG review 🤍 - Origin Trial example 🤍 - Mozilla wiki on adding features 🤍 - Suggestions to Microsoft 🤍 - tweets when browser makers announce their intent to ship, change or remove features in their web engines 🤍 - 🤍 - Web Incubator Community Group 🤍 & 🤍 - Web Assembly Community Group 🤍 - zine on twitter: bit.ly/tc39-zine - Blogpost by Jake Archibald 🤍 What are the key takeaways from this talk? People will walk away from this talk with an understanding of web standards process and will walk away with knowledge of architectural decision which needs to be made to add a new feature to the web platform. Mariko (🤍kosamari) is a drawsplainer working at the team what build Google Chrome. She also co-organize a local JavaScript meetup in NYC called BrooklynJS. Sign up for our Newsletter to receive the latest updates on JS Kongress 2020 (April 15-16 in Munich, Germany) every other Thursday: 🤍

Creating Textile With Javascript // Mariko Kosaka, Scripto (Hosted By FirstMark)

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07.03.2016

Mariko Kosaka of Scripto spoke at FirstMark's Code Driven NYC on January 26, 2016. She discussed her process of using code to create designs on knitting machines. FirstMark Capital is an early stage venture capital firm based in New York City. Code Driven NYC is a community organized by FirstMark that brings together leading developers from across the tech ecosystem to learn, get inspired, and have fun. Join the group at 🤍 or find out more at 🤍

DuraznoConf 2018. Mariko Kosaka

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05.12.2018

DuraznoConf 2018. El lado humano de la programación. Mariko Kosaka 4/10/2018 UTEC - Intendencia de Durazno

Mariko Kosaka - Making a Robot Eye with JS or Magic of Computer Vision Unraveled - CascadiaFest 2016

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00:33:38
17.08.2016

Have you ever wondered how computers see images? Do you want to work on an AR (Augmented Reality) project or build a NodeBot that can recognize and track your face? How about making your own Instagram-like app or finding similer images in Pinterest collection? When you work with an image as your data input, sooner or later you'll encounter the magic term Computer Vision. It can be intimidating to get started. At first, that led me to choose a common and powerful library that works like magic in an unfamiliar language (C). It felt like the library was a black box and I had no control. I started to wonder, what is so magical about computer vision? After all it is just code someone wrote. Can we unravel it? and reconstruct in JavaScript?? The answer is YES. In this talk, we'll start by getting image data from canvas object, then transform the data to alter an appearance of the image. You will get insight into what data looks like to a browser (hint: it's just an array of numbers !). Next we’ll talk about how to interpret and analyze the data in a meaningful way. Finally, we'll apply what we learned and go through simple image analysis process to build your own AR app in vanilla JavaScript!

DevByte: Speed optimization for web apps with Mariko Kosaka & Jake Archibald, Google

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00:05:25
20.12.2018

Youtube applied a bunch of speed optimization techniques back in 2009, many of which we are still applicable in 2018. Jake and Mariko chats about the technique and discuss the differences between then and now. 2012 blog mentioned by Mariko: 🤍 Learn more about the DevFest OnAir 2018 event → 🤍 DevFest OnAir 2018 playlists: Cloud Track playlist → 🤍 Mobile Track→ 🤍 Voice & Web Track → 🤍 Subscribe to the GDG channel! 🤍 event: DevFest 2018; re_ty: Publish; fullname: Mariko Kosaka, Jake Archibald;

Mariko Kosaka - Confusio Linguarum [ Thunder Plains 2015 ]

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01.02.2016

Confusio Linguarum (how to help your large silent minority users) As non-native English speaker, I am constantly struggling to "read the document" in English. I get frustrated for not being able to "read between lines" of Github comments. I get embarrassed when I don't get sarcasm on slack chat. Typo in variable name is the story of my life. The Tech industry is undeniably Anglocentric. The de-facto language used to develop, document, and market software is English, and It is often overlooked that software is used largely by non-English speaking communities. As someone who speaks English as a second language, it's mostly confusing and sometime very frustrating to navigate through this tech scene. I want to make it better by shearing my experience. Let's pause for a moment talking about libraries and syntax, and look at the experience of a silent majority. About Mariko Kosaka: Mariko is an engineer living in New York City. When she is not making software at Scripto, she uses Javascript to help her knit and co-organize local meetup BrooklynJS.

PWA Camp 2017: Mariko Kosaka "HTTPS & Adoption in PWA"

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05.08.2017

Mariko Kosaka is Developer Relations for Google. Recorded July 22, 2017 for Google Developers Group New York City at General Assembly. PWA Camp is the first in a series of Study Camps designed to jumpstart understanding of a technology through a combination of tech talks and hands-on code labs in a community setting. PWA (Progressive Web Apps) are new web applications that provide a fast fluid experience despite network connectivity, device type, or operating system.

Web Rebels 2017 – Mariko Kosaka & Suz Hinton – Can You Read Me?

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00:48:55
02.10.2017

Can You Read Me? Creative JavaScript to Make Computer Science Fun Two web developers who are full of curiosity to learn all about machines and code met at a meetup. Unsatisfied with traditional computer science textbook and what we felt like not so learner friendly software engineering landscape, we decided to learn by working together in the format we enjoy the most - creative project. We are building machines (both software and hardware) in JavaScript to send secret messages to each other. Different forms of data blob are exchanged periodically as a message. In order to read those messages, each has to learn and build a system to decode the data. This talk will tell the story of the machines, their parts, and the possibilities of remote creative collaboration. You’ll come away with fresh inspiration on how JavaScript can be used to learn computer science concepts the enjoyable way. Mariko Kosaka Mariko is an engineer who loves data and knitting. When she is not making software at Scripto, she uses code to help her design textiles & organize a local JavaScript meetup in New York City called BrooklynJS. Suz Hinton Suz Hinton is a JavaScript developer who likes to tinker with hardware. Beside of being a technical evangelist at Microsoft she's a maker at heart and no stranger to minor burns from soldering irons and 3D printers. She's a regular contributor to the open source Node.js electronics scene, and enjoys teaching others how to immerse themselves in the nerdiverse.

Open Source & Feelings 2015 - Re-inventing the Rosetta Stone Together by Mariko Kosaka

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12.10.2015

Re-inventing the Rosetta Stone Together by Mariko Kosaka Many tech projects are anglocentric. The de facto language used to develop and document a project is English, and it is often overlooked that a project is used largely by non-English speaking communities. We programmers like to think "code is the universal language," but getting to speak code still involves overcoming language barriers. Even after you speak code, your experience working on project involves a lot of cultural references and language use specific to English. So let's pause for a moment talking about the newest features and technical specs, look at the experience of a silent majority, and talk about how we can welcome them to your project today! Help us caption & translate this video! 🤍

DevByte: The Background fetch API with Mariko Kosaka & Jake Archibald, Google

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20.12.2018

The new Background Fetch API allows uploads and downloads to continue in the background, even if the browser closes. Jake chats to Mariko about it, using a web app he made for his own podcast. Recommended Resources 🤍 🤍 Learn more about the DevFest OnAir 2018 event → 🤍 DevFest OnAir 2018 playlists: Cloud Track playlist → 🤍 Mobile Track→ 🤍 Voice & Web Track → 🤍 Subscribe to the GDG channel! 🤍 event: DevFest 2018; re_ty: Publish; fullname: Mariko Kosaka, Jake Archibald;

Mariko Kosaka - How to be a compiler - BrazilJS Conf 2017

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04.12.2017

Aprender uma nova linguagem é como treinar o seu cérebro a ser um compilador. Mas o que um compilador faz? e como nós podemos fazer um? Vamos escrever um pequeno compilador juntos. Assim que você escrever um compilador, você não somente entenderá como o seu código JavaScript funciona por debaixo dos panos, mas também será melhor em fazer um ambiente inclusivo para pessoas que estão aprendendo uma linguagem diferente.

!!Con 2016 - Ink on fingers! The history of printing (with code!) By Mariko Kosaka

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02.06.2016

Ink on fingers! The history of printing (with code!) before computer screens By Mariko Kosaka What do you imagine when you hear "letter press" or "typesetter"? You might think of the Gutenberg Bible or a hip print shop in Brooklyn, but typesetting machines attracted many engineers' creative curiosity long before everyone had their own home printer or a website. The typesetting machine was invented out of "don't repeat yourself" mentality, and was one of the first machines to be automated. Before we had computer screens, programmers were making domain-specific languages to print images with code. Ken Thompson once hacked on a typesetter to create emoji for his chess machine. Modern software like WYSIWIG editors would not exist if these creative programmers hadn't put ink on their fingers. Let's look back at the part of computing history that underlies daily activities like writing documentation in Markdown and reacting with emoji! Help us caption & translate this video! 🤍

Becoming a Creative Coder -- Designer vs. Developer #7

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02.04.2022

In Designer vs. Developer 'Becoming a Creative Coder' Mustafa speaks to Mariko Kosaka, a Developer Advocate on the Google Developers Relations Team, about the art she creates with code and how developers can embrace the notion of making something that isn’t necessarily useful but still has value. You can subscribe to or download our podcast from these services: iTunes: Google Music: (USA ONLY) Web Fundamentals: Feedburner: Read our blog post here: Learn more about the subjects mentioned in our video: Sweaterify - 64 Stitches - Designer vs. Developer is a show that tries to solve the challenges faced in the industry by opening a conversation between the two, providing take aways, solutions to workflows, tools & discussions on everyday struggles. Subscribe to the Chrome Developers Channel: Watch the rest of the series:

Entrevista Mariko Kosaka - BrazilJS

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23.01.2018

A Web Developer Relation do Google, Mariko Kosaka, palestrou no BrazilJS sobre “HOW TO BE A COMPILER”. A Co-organizadora do brooklyn_js e do ridgewood_js. Falou sobre o que um compilador faz e como treinar seu cérebro para ser um compilador. Segundo Mariko, assim que você escrever um compilador, você não somente entenderá como o seu código JavaScript funciona por debaixo dos panos, mas também será melhor em fazer um ambiente inclusivo para pessoas que estão aprendendo uma linguagem diferente. Confere só! A Umbler é uma solução projetada para facilitar o trabalho de quem desenvolve para a web. Além de oferecermos serviços de Cloud Hosting, E-mails e Registro de Domínio, queremos estimular a troca de conhecimentos e educação no universo do desenvolvimento. Clica no play, inscreva-se no nosso canal e fique por dentro do que rola no universo da tecnologia, do marketing e do desenvolvimento. Saiba mais sobre a Umbler em 🤍

How to animate a website without a performance hit.

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10.04.2020

Making of an simple web app that animates a single div. How to identify rendering performance issue with Chrome DevTools. app: 🤍

What is/Who Makes "The Platform" (Polymer Summit 2017)

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23.08.2017

#UseThePlatform, but what even is the platform? and who makes the platform?? In this video, Mariko Kosaka, a Developer Advocate at Google, investigates how the web platform standards are made. Check out the rest of the Polymer Summit session videos here: 🤍 Subscribe to the Google Chrome Developers channel: 🤍

Season 2 is Coming -- Designer vs. Developer #S2

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19.07.2017

Season 2 of Designer vs. Developer is coming soon! Check out YouTube.com/ChromeDevelopers on 26th July at 1700 BST for the first episode featuring Mustafa Kurtuldu speaking to Mariko Kosaka - a developer at Google. Check out the first series here: 🤍 Subscribe to the Chrome Developers channel: 🤍

The Science of what Makes Snappy Interactions - Reactivate London - March 18

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03.04.2018

Mariko Kosaka Google Mariko is a web engineer working at Google who likes to fiddle with browser and yarn. She uses code to help her design textiles and organize a local JavaScript meetup in New York City called BrooklynJS.

Making D3.js sorting scarf

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00:00:31
09.12.2015

Becoming a Creative Coder -- Designer vs. Developer #7

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26.07.2017

In Designer vs. Developer 'Becoming a Creative Coder' Mustafa speaks to Mariko Kosaka, a Developer Advocate on the Google Developers Relations Team, about the art she creates with code and how developers can embrace the notion of making something that isn’t necessarily useful but still has value. You can subscribe to or download our podcast from these services: iTunes: 🤍 Google Music: 🤍 (USA ONLY) Web Fundamentals: 🤍 Feedburner: 🤍 Read our blog post here: 🤍 Learn more about the subjects mentioned in our video: Sweaterify - 🤍 64 Stitches - 🤍 Designer vs. Developer is a show that tries to solve the challenges faced in the industry by opening a conversation between the two, providing take aways, solutions to workflows, tools & discussions on everyday struggles. Subscribe to the Chrome Developers Channel: 🤍 Watch the rest of the series: 🤍

WebWorkers: Code Session - Supercharged

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01:06:35
27.04.2022

In this Supercharged Live Code Session, Mariko Kosaka joins Surma to show you how to use WebWorkers to keep your main thread jank free. Find Mariko’s code here: Surma’s article about animating a blur: Send your questions and ideas to the guys and they will read them live or answer them in the comments below. Will there be bugs? Watch and see. Follow Mariko on Twitter: Follow Surma on Twitter: Watch more episodes of Supercharged here: Subscribe to the Chrome Developers channel at

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